Posts tagged girls

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

theblackdripsgold:

Caption: FIERCE WOMEN OF COLOR stand in the sunset.  Young black male stares forward, flecks of light clouding his face.

I introduce you to creative content from my sister, VARA AYANNA. 

She’s jump starting a fashion blog and magazine. She wants to highlight unique fashions and events that inspire. She wants to showcase the unseen.  

This is from her CHRONICLE 1 shoot she put together.  She’s adorable, gorgeous, fierece, curvy and a woman of color .

Follow her:

Instagram———>@Varaayanna

Twitter————> @Varaayanna

SIGNAL BOOST if you wish. 

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago
Posted 2 years ago

Elizabeth Montgomery, Judy Carne, and Marlo Thomas, 1966.

(Source: jeanjeanie61)

Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
I’m sure that whatever was meant by a naked Lena Dunham eating on a toilet and punching Jimmy Kimmel, it spoke deeply and directly to young women around the country.
NYTimes Art Blogger Mike Hale 
Posted 2 years ago

How Schools Shortchange Girls: The AAWU Report (published back in 1992, though there is more current research that shows that these dynamics persist) showed exactly what my mom was talking about and what I was noticing as an angry little 11 year old:

A large body of research indicates that teachers give more classroom attention and more esteem-building encouragement to boys. In a study conducted by Myra and David Sadker, boys in elementary and middle school called out answers eight times more often than girls. When boys called out, teachers listened. But when girls called out, they were told to “raise your hand if you want to speak.” Even when boys do not volunteer, teachers are more likely to encourage them to give an answer or an opinion than they are to encourage girls.

Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago

Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929), Slide from Walking Piece, 1966. 

Posted 2 years ago
‘Right. I look fine. Except I don’t,’ said Zora, tugging sadly at her man’s nightshirt.
This was why Kiki had dreaded having girls: she knew she wouldn’t be able to protect them from self-disgust. To that end she had tried banning television in the early years, and never had a lipstick or a woman’s magazine crossed the threshold of the Belsey home to Kiki’s knowledge, but these and other precautionary measures had made no difference. It was in the air, or so it seemed to Kiki, this hatred of women and their bodies— it seeped in with every draught in the house; people brought it home on their shoes, they breathed it in off their newspapers. There was no way to control it.
Zadie Smith, On Beauty